Askanesthetician's Blog

An esthetician explores skincare issues and concerns

For My Fellow Estheticians and For Aspiring Estheticians: Resources and Inspiration July 31, 2013

Spa day cake

No matter what industry you are in you know how important it is to keep improving and learning.  Everyone experiences burn out sometimes and needs inspiration in order to keep doing their best.  I’ve been thinking about these themes lately are they pertain to being an esthetician and thought I would share some articles, a book, and a website recommendation with my readers.  I know that quite a few estheticians read my blog (which makes me very happy) and aspiring estheticians as well.  Even if you aren’t an esthetician I hope that you’ll find this post helpful as well.

Book Recommendation

I just completed reading Lydia Sarfati’s book Success at Your Fingertips: How to Succeed in the Skin Care Business and am so happy that I got a chance to read this book!  Sarfati is the founder and president of the skincare line Repechage and an experienced esthetics professional.  She started her career as an esthetician and now owns Repechage and spas; she is also a spa industry consultant.  This book shares  invaluable experience, expertise, and advice for all estheticians – from those just beginning their career to those who have been treating skin for a long time.  Sarfati outlines how to start your own successful business, how to hire and manage employees (as a spa employee myself I thought this chapter was great since so many spas mismanage their employees), how to achieve retail goals, how to market yourself and your spa, and lastly how to balance your work life with your personal life.  This book did a great job at touching on all the important issues that estheticians have to deal with while being very readable and relatable.  If you are thinking of starting your own spa business this book is a must read, and even if you work for someone else at the moment you’ll find valuable tips in this book about how to succeed as an esthetician.  Even if you don’t work in the esthetics field I think her advice can be very helpful.  The chapter about managing employees can certainly help all bosses, no matter what profession they are in.  Highly recommended!

Though this book has nothing to do with skincare lately I’ve been reminded how important our words are and which words we choose to use (or not to use in a lot of cases).  Those thoughts made me reread an old favorite called Togue Fu! .  Knowing how to communicate with our clients (and our managers and our coworkers) correctly makes us much better estheticians.  As a matter of fact, without good communications skills it doesn’t matter how much skincare knowledge we have as estheticians we just won’t succeed.  So if you feel like you need some help in the communication department I definitely recommend reading this book.

Recommended Blog 

If you are thinking about becoming an esthetician or have just finished esthetics school it can be hard to find real-life information about your chosen field.  Looking for a job, especially when you still don’t have experience, can seem overwhelming at times.  Recently I discovered the blog My Life as an Esthetician which provides readers with very valuable information about being an esthetician such as resume advice and possible career paths   once you have your license.  It is well worth checking out.

Recommended Reading

Skin Inc. has published a number of interesting articles lately on how to maintain and manage your client base:

Recommended Resource

I’m a little late to the game with recommending the following website/forum, Skin Care Professionals, but I’m very glad I finally found it.  I follow a few esthetician groups on Linked In and find them very helpful as a way to connect and learn from my fellow estheticians and this website provides another way to connect with your fellow estheticians.  Once your membership with the site is approved you can post and respond to questions in the forum section. Many times as esthetician we work solo or only with a few other estheticians so having a way to “talk” with other estheticians can be invaluable and career enriching.  I always tell people that one of the reasons I love being an esthetician is that estheticians, for the most part, are friendly and helpful to one another, always willing to dispense tips and advice to one another.

I hope this post has both inspired and helped my fellow estheticians and all other readers as well.  Wishing everyone lots of career success and happiness!

My Related Posts:

Image from pinterest.com

 

Remembering Two Skincare Pioneers July 23, 2013

Recently two dermatologists who made groundbreaking contributions to the skincare industry passed away.  Both Dr. James Fulton and Dr. Sheldon Pinnell changed the skincare industry as we know making lasting and significant impacts in the field of dermatology and esthetics.

Dr. James Fulton

Dr. Fulton will probably be remembered best for his research and discoveries connected to acne.  He was the co-developer, with Dr. Albert Kligman, of Retin-A, and pioneered cosmetic surgical procedures in order reduce acne scars.

Skin Inc.‘s obituary outlines Dr. Fulton’s career:

Born in Ottumwa, Iowa to Alice Hermann Fulton and James Sr. (a one-time CEO of Cracker Jack), Fulton’s interest in dermatology stemmed from the acne struggles he endured as a pre-teen and throughout adulthood. He earned his bachelor of science and doctor of medicine degrees from Tulane University in 1965, and while there his academic achievements led to his induction into the prestigious Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society and Phi Beta Kappa Society. While in residency at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Fulton met his close friend and mentor Dr. Albert Kligman; together they co-developed Retin-A, a topical form of vitamin A. At the request of Phillip Frost, MD, he relocated to South Florida and earned a PhD in biochemistry under the noted dermatologist Harvey Blank, MD, from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine in the early 1970s. Fulton and Blank developed benzoyl peroxide gel (Panoxyl) and topical erythromycin (E-Gel).

In the early 1970’s with his wife Sara, Fulton launched a successful chain of 12 acne clinics called Acne Healthcare Centers, opened the Acne Research Institute and developed and manufactured a line of patented skin care products under the AHC and Face Up brands in their FDA-approved manufacturing facilities. Here he invented a high-speed diamond fraise for dermabrasion and was the first to use estheticians in the medical office developing a paramedical esthetician training program.

In 1990, Fulton opened JEF Medical Group, a cosmetic surgery and dermatology practice where he pioneered fat transfer and laser surgery and was the first to use hyperbaric oxygen chambers for post-surgical recovery. In addition, Fulton and Sara co-founded Vivant Skin Care in 1990, a clinical skin care line rooted in Fulton’s patented vitamin A therapies.

Fulton served as mentor and role model for countless leaders in dermatology and esthetics across the nation. Most recently he was volunteer faculty at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine’s Department of Dermatology and part of the internship program at St. Thomas University. A popular international speaker and teacher, he authored the definitive book Acne Rx and published more than 300 medical articles, the most recent ones being released earlier this year in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology and presented at the Skin of Color Seminar Series in New York City and the Orlando Dermatology & Aesthetic & Clinical Conference.

Fulton volunteered his dermatology services to His House Children’s Home, a private, nonprofit, faith-based foster children organization, to which he provided no-charge medical treatment to the children and hosted a yearly Thanksgiving luncheon. He actively split time between Flores Dermatology in Coral Gables where he continued to see patients weekly and his research lab at the Vivant Skin Care headquarters in Miami Lakes until taking ill in mid-June.

He was most proud of his beloved wife, Sara, who helped him with his PhD, and worked with him in research and in the medical office. She always attended medical meetings with him and helped with his teaching projects. Fulton always told her he couldn’t have done what he did without her. Among his noteworthy achievements were creating more than 50 original skin care formulations, stabilizing benzoyl peroxide in gel form, qualifying as a Full Fellow of the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery, membership in the American Society of Lipo Suction Surgery and election to the Dermatology Foundation’s Leader Society.

Dr. Fulton passed away from colon cancer on July 4, 2013.

Dr. Sheldon Pinnell

Dr. Pinnell, whose research changed the use of topical antioxidants in the skincare industry forever, also passed away on July 4, 2013.

According to his obituary in Skin Inc.:

Sheldon Pinnell, MD, an internationally eminent scientist, dermatologist, leading scientist behind L’Oreal-owned SkinCeuticals, and J. Lamar Callaway professor emeritus of dermatology and chief emeritus of the division of dermatology at Duke University, passed away peacefully in Durham, NC, on Thursday, July 4, 2013. He was 76.

Pinnell’s investigative research has changed the way the world uses topical antioxidants today. As one of the founding fathers of topical antioxidants, he was the first to patent a stable form of vitamin C proven through peer-reviewed research to effectively penetrate skin, delivering eight times the skin’s natural antioxidant protection.

Before helping to shape the cosmeceutical industry, Pinnell led major advances in the understanding of skin biology and the parthenogenesis of skin diseases. Early in his career, he made seminal contributions to the understanding of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and the role of vitamin C in collagen biosynthesis. Pinnell has been globally recognized for his contributions to science and skin care, most recently receiving an honorary membership to the Society for Investigative Dermatology.

Over his lifetime, he also received numerous medical and scientific awards including the “Best Doctors in America, the international Who’s Who in Medicine and HealthcareWho’s Who in Science and Engineeringand Who’s Who in America. Pinnell has published more than 200 scientific articles in peer-reviewed journals on dermatology topics such as photoaging, collagen synthesis, UV protectiontopical vitamin C and other antioxidants. Pinnell also authored approximately 20 book chapters and holds10 patents.

“It is our greatest privilege to have been able to help Pinnell bring his discovery of topical antioxidants to life. Prior to the introduction of topical vitamin C in the early 1990s, skin care professionals were largely limited to sunscreens to protect against the deleterious effects of the sun. It was Pinnell who gave the medical community the confidence to transform the approach to at-home skincare. We are fortunate to have known Pinnell as a scientist, a family man and a dear friend. His life lessons and infectious spirit will remain with us forever,” said SkinCeuticals co-founders Alden Pinnell and Russell Moon.

Further Reading:

Image from parajunkee.com

 

What’s A Serum? July 17, 2013

Filed under: Skincare products — askanesthetician @ 7:30 am
Tags: , , , ,

The number of facial skincare products available can be mind-boggling and downright confusing.  I think that one of the most perplexing skincare products for people to understand its use is a serum.

On her Daily Glow blog Dr. Jessica Wu explains:

Serums are thinner and lighter than lotions and creams, and they tend to have a higher concentration of active ingredients. They’re often meant to target a specific problem, like fine lines, dark spots, or undereye puffiness, so you can use them to spot-treat a particular area. Since they’re often water-based, some water-soluble ingredients like alpha-hydroxy (glycolic) acids are easier to formulate into a serum than a cream. However, serums are not necessarily more effective than creams; what’s important are the actual ingredients and their concentrations.

As explained above serums can be a great way to treat stubborn skincare issues like hyperpigmentation or acne, giving your skincare routine that extra push that it needs in order to be more effective.  Serums can contain ingredients such as:

ANTIOXIDANTS
Because of their efficient delivery system, serums can infuse the skin with antioxidants. Coenzyme Q10 is one that works very well in serums, for example.

VITAMINS
Vitamins A, C and E show up in many serums, mainly for their antioxidant properties. Look for them in formulas targeting aging.

SKIN BRIGHTENERS
You can expect to find natural skin brighteners like willow bark and rose extracts in serums that address dull-looking skin.

HYALURONIC ACID
In addition to hydrating, hyaluronic acid allows serums to penetrate deeper and stimulate new cell growth.

PEPTIDES AND GROWTH FACTORS
Since both are water-soluble and revered for their ability to ward off signs of aging, they can be delivered more potently and effectively in liquid form.

EXFOLIATORS
AHAs like lactic and glycolic acid remove dead skin. (Keep in mind, however, that even in serums, acids can irritate the skin.)

(What to Expect From SerumsNew Beauty)

Since the consistency of a serum is lighter and thinner than that of a cream you use it directly on your skin after cleansing.  Wait between 5 to 15 minutes in order to allow for penetration before you put on your moisturizer or sunscreen.  Generally a little bit of a serum goes a long way since the products are formulated to be concentrated and effective.

But before you run out to buy a serum (which can be very expensive) I want to quote Dr. Ellen Marmur’s take on serums.  This is from her excellent book (see my review here) Simple Skin Beauty – pages 297-298 (hardcover):

Skin Lie:  Serums penetrate the skin better than creams or lotions do.

Skin Truth:  Marketing departments are always devising sensible reasons for us to buy something new and unnecessary.  According to magazine articles and cosmetic advertisements, a serum should be layered underneath a moisturizer since it has a more concentrated composition of ingredients.  Okay.  But the fact is that a serum is not necessarily stronger than a lotion or cream delivery system.  And since the label doesn’t tell us the concentration of ingredients, we can’t be sure if it is more potent.  Some serums are oil-based, some are water-based, some might allow the ingredients to remain more stable, and some may be more compatible with the skin.  Serums (like every other product on the shelves) are not created equal, but it’s difficult to gauge any of this because cosmeceutical labels don’t provide enough information.  Perhaps an unstable ingredient (such as Vitamin C) may remain stable in a serum formulation containing fewer inactive ingredients.  If so, layering it underneath a sunscreen might make sense.  In general, I think a serum is just another layer, another product to purchase, and more time you have to spend on your face.

Personally I love to use a Vitamin C in the morning underneath my moisturizer and sunscreen.  I definitely believe that the best way to get Vitamin C into the skin is through a serum.  I also believe that exfoliating serums are a great alternative to harsh scrubs and an easy way to renew the skin since once you put the serum on there is no need to wash it off.  Exfoliation made easy.

Do you use a serum?  Have a favorite?  Please share below.

My Related Posts:

Further Reading:

Image from hellomagazine.com

 

So Just What Is Dry Brushing? July 11, 2013

Ever heard of dry brushing?  Never heard of dry brushing?  Ever wondered what dry brushing is?  Here are all the answers.

Dry brushing is a relatively simple process that uses, you guessed it, a dry brush on dry skin.

First lets begin with the benefits of dry brushing.  If you dry brush you’ll have:

  • Skin that is healthier and smoother: removing dead skin cells and opening pores to allow them to “breath” and absorb nutrients.
  • Stimulated lymphatic and circulatory systems: boosting your immune system and increasing circulation to help detoxify.
  • Stress relief: increasing your blood flow reduces stressed areas of the body and stimulates nerve endings in your skin which in turn rejuvenates your nervous system.
  • Reduced cellulite: increasing blood circulation to the skin helps break down and releases toxins that cause cellulite in legs and hips.

(From drybrushing.net)

I must address the issue of cellulite and dry brushing since almost any time you read about dry brushing you’ll find that supposedly dry brushing reduces cellulite.  Please don’t rush out to buy a brush and start dry brushing like mad in order to reduce your cellulite because, sorry to say, I really don’t think that dry brushing will reduce cellulite.  If your skin is smoother from dry brushing than the appearance of your cellulite might be reduced but nothing more.  Most people have some cellulite and there is no cure* for it so dry brush in order to exfoliate but not to reduce cellulite.  (For more information about cellulite see my previous post Can You Get Rid of Cellulite?)

I am not the only one who thinks that the claim that dry brushing will eliminate cellulite is incorrect.  Dr. Weil, guru of integrative medicine, debunks some myths about dry brushing:

The notion that dry brushing can reduce or eliminate cellulite make no sense. Fat is arranged in large chambers separated from each other by columns of connective tissue. If fat overflows these chambers as a result of being overweight, or if the connective tissue slackens with age (as it invariably does), the result is the classic pitting and bulging we have come to know as cellulite. I have never seen any treatment that can effectively eliminate it. An improvement in the “appearance” of cellulite may be in the eye of the beholder, but I doubt that any objective change takes place with dry brushing.

The idea that the method can eliminate “up to a pound of toxins a day,” as some proponents claim, is ridiculous. First of all, the body does a pretty good job of cleansing and purifying itself. If you feel the need, you can help speed the removal of unwanted materials by drinking more water to increase urinary output, taking steam baths or saunas to promote sweating, adjusting diet and fiber intake to ensure regular eliminations, and getting enough aerobic activity to stimulate breathing. In addition, taking the herbal remedymilk thistle supports normal, healthy liver metabolism, aiding its important role in detoxification.

I would take the health claims for dry brushing with a big grain of salt. If you enjoy it and believe it benefits you, there’s no reason not to do it. But if you find that it irritates or inflames your skin, you might want to opt for a less abrasive spa treatment.

Just how often should you dry brush and how do you do it?:

How often: Dry skin brushing effectively opens up the pores on your skin. This is something you can — and should — be doing daily, even twice a day. Your skin should be dry, so the ideal time is in the shower before you turn on the water. Just a reminder, don’t get the brush wet.

Direction: You should only brush towards the heart. Making long sweeps, avoid back and forth, scrubbing and circular motions. Start at your feet, moving up the legs on both sides, then work from the arms toward your chest. On your stomach, direct the brush counterclockwise. And, don’t brush too hard: Skin should be stimulated and invigorated but not irritated or red.

Type of brush: The bristles should be natural, not synthetic, and preferably vegetable-derived. The bristles themselves should be somewhat stiff, though not too hard. Look for one that has an attachable handle for hard-to-reach spots, if necessary.

(From Dry Brushing Benefits: Banish Cellulite, Improve Skin Tone and MoreHuffington Post)

If you have a skin condition such as eczema or psoriasis, have inflamed skin, or sunburned skin stay away from dry brushing.  I would also advise against dry brushing your face.  There are many more effective ways to exfoliate the face.

Personal Experience

I started dry brushing a few weeks ago before my evening shower.  I have to admit that I do forget to dry brush before some showers, but I have been pretty consistent over all.  I find the process quick and invigorating; it definitely wakes you up.  The one benefit I’ve noticed since beginning dry brushing is that my skin is super soft.  Yes, I moisturize after the shower but this is a level of softness that I can’t remember ever experiencing.  Otherwise, I have to admit, I haven’t seen any other benefits from dry brushing just yet.

Bottom Line:  I would definitely recommend dry brushing as an effective way to exfoliate the skin on your body.  Forget the claims about reducing cellulite and detoxifying the body.  Just dry brush away if it feels good!

*Though there is no cure for cellulite there is a promising new treatment for reducing the appearance of cellulite.  It is called Cellulaze.

Further Reading:

Image from healinglifestyles.com

 

 

Book Review: Heal Your Skin July 5, 2013

There are an endless number of skincare books by dermatologists on the market.  When I decide to purchase (or in this case I asked for this book as a birthday present so many thanks to my sister) yet another skincare book by a dermatologist I want to know that there is some different sort of content in the book that sets it apart from all the other books out there.  In the case of Dr. Ava Shamban’s book – Heal Your Skin: The Breakthrough Plan for Renewal – what I found that was different, especially for a book intended for mainstream, public use, was the chapter about how to care for your skin during cancer treatment.  After reading the book I also thought that this was the strongest chapter in the book overall.

Pros

This book is above all easy to read, written in accessible language, and has very concrete steps and suggestions about how to care for one’s skin.  After the obligatory introduction about how the skin works Dr. Shamban gets down to business by talking about what damages the skin and how to stop those “skin enemies”.  Chapter 4 of the book contains great introduction about how to build a skincare routine at home and really explains the basics of good skincare.  Chapter 5 which deals with food, nutrition, and skincare does a fine job at helping readers figure out what to eat in order to stay healthy and have great skin.

The next four chapters in the book, six through nine, discuss specific life situations that impact the skin and how to care for your skin while dealing with or experiencing these situations or issues.  The topics are: pregnancy, menopause, adult acne, and cancer treatment.  Each chapter follows that same format: how the particular topic of the chapter affects your skin, how to heal your skin, skincare and treatment options, nutrition and fitness tips, and step by step skincare regimes.  Dr. Shamban does not, for the most part, recommend specific products instead she gives readers a long list of ingredients to look for when searching for the right products for their skin.  Each of these chapters really gets down to the nitty-gritty of these topics – explaining in detail about what to expect skin-wise when going through these life events or issues, why your skin behaves as it does in these situations, and how best to treat your skin.  The information in each chapter is not only specific but valuable as well.  Out of these four chapters I thought the one about caring for your skin while undergoing cancer treatment was the best (as I already mentioned above).  Since I’ve studied the topic of oncology esthetics more in-depth I can definitely say that Dr. Shamban did a great job at getting the most important information across to the reader/patient in a clear and concise way.  Her concrete advice will definitely help those undergoing cancer treatment.

Next the book has a chapter on fitness and skincare with actual fitness plans.  Lastly a chapter with recipes for homemade skincare products (cleansers, scrubs, masks, etc.).  I haven’t made any of the recipes yet, but I plan to in the future.  The book even contains an appendix that breaks down three ingredient labels for products which is always helpful since trying to understand skincare products labels can be a challenge.

Cons

Truthfully I liked this book so I don’t have that much to say in the cons area of the this post.  There were a few minor things that bothered me.  Though Dr. Shamban does not in any way reach the levels hubris that Dr. Wu does in her skincare book (see my review of Dr. Wu’s book for more information about that) she does mention numerous times that she has many celebrity clients and that she was the dermatologist on the TV show “Extreme Makeover” (I should add that I used to watch that show because the makeovers, and who doesn’t love a good makeover, were jaw dropping though totally disturbing on a psychological level.  But that’s a different topic for a different blog).  I don’t understand the need to mention either of these facts more than once.  I really could care less how many celebrity clients Dr. Shamban has. I’m interested in her knowledge and expertise.

The other thing that bothered me about the book was the in skincare regimen sections.  There Dr. Shamban lists numerous ingredients to look for in skincare products and numerous ingredients to avoid.  The lists are overwhelming.  Only occasionally does she recommends specific products.  The fact that she doesn’t recommend products doesn’t bother me per-say, it is the length of the list of ingredients that really irked me and also the fact that there is no explanation about why certain ingredients are ok and others are not.  Personally I like explanations and would like to know why Dr. Shamban recommends certain ingredients but not others.  And if there wasn’t room in the book to explain each ingredient maybe the list should have been shorter with explanations.  I think just listing ingredients is a determent to readers since few people have the time or patience to research skincare ingredients or skincare products’ ingredient lists online or in a store.  In the end I suspect that most readers will continue to use the same products they have always used because they will be overwhelmed with the task of determining for themselves if a product has the right ingredients in it or not.

Lastly, because two of the main topics of the book are pregnancy and menopause this book is really geared toward women and not men which is a shame since men are becoming more and more interested in proper skincare.  It is too bad the book wasn’t more inclusive.

Bottom Line:  I would actually recommend buying this book if you are looking for a good, basic skincare knowledge book to have at home as a guide and if you are a woman.  If you want specific skincare product recommendations you are better off with a different book like Dr. Leslie Baumann’s The Skin Type Solution.  (See my review of her book)  I would recommend looking at Dr. Baumann’s book at the library or Barnes and Noble instead of purchasing it.  If you are undergoing cancer treatment or know someone who is the chapter in this book that deals with skincare during cancer treatment will be invaluable for you or your loved one.

Image from whatshaute.com

 

 
%d bloggers like this: